Tag Archives: multimedia

The Best Free Resource You Aren’t Using

by Hope Morley

If you think about the Library of Congress at all, perhaps you imagine a giant library with stacks of books going up to the ceiling, or maybe you think it’s merely dusty old congressional records. While both of those things are true, their website is also a great resource for teachers. And best of all, it’s free!

Courtesy of the Library of Congress, LC-DIG-jpd-02457

Teahouse at Koishikawa | Courtesy of the Library of Congress, LC-DIG-jpd-02457

Spend a little time exploring the homepage. The Prints & Photographs division has millions of digital images that are easy to search and download. The Civil War photographs and Farm Security Administration collections are particularly worth exploring. Some of the collections may surprise you. Did you know the LOC has an excellent collection of Japanese art prints?

The Film division contains many early motion pictures, including from Thomas Edison’s studio, which make a great study of technology and inventions. Show students this 1894 video of boxing cats to prove that cat videos were popular long before YouTube!

Courtesy of the Library of Congress, LC-DIG-fsa-8b29516

Migrant Mother | Courtesy of the Library of Congress, LC-DIG-fsa-8b29516

Though some of the sites are a little old and not very pretty, LOC’s Digital Collections (formerly the American Memory series) is full of curated content ripe for the picking. Looking for documents from the Constitutional Convention? Historical sheet music? Videos of the Spanish-American War, including Teddy Roosevelt and his Rough Riders? A history of the American conservation movement? A web archive of the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City? You may find things you didn’t know would be fascinating, like a history of Dolly Parton and early country music.

Some content comes from other sources, such as universities and local historical societies, which extends the reach of the site. They have whole collections of African American history, women’s history, technology, and more. Don’t let the old-fashioned look of some of the pages scare you off!

Courtesy of the Library of Congress, LC-DIG-ppprs-00626

First Flight | Courtesy of the Library of Congress, LC-DIG-ppprs-00626

For teacher-focused materials, head over to their teacher page. This site contains lesson plans, presentations, and student activities. Lesson plans include recommended grade levels and many have Common Core correlations. You’ll also find tips for using primary sources in the classroom and some professional development lessons.

What are your favorite resources from LOC? Tell us in the comments!

Hope bioHope Morley is a consultant and social media coordinator for Green Light Professional Development. She writes about social media, conferences, and anything else on the web that helps both students and teachers learn. Follow her @GreenlightLT

Resources for Integrating Multimedia into your Classroom

by Erin Dye

Multimedia is a huge part of the Common Core. Two of the standards (RL.7 and RI.7, in most grades) explicitly call for analyzing multimedia, and other standards can be enhanced by the addition of high-quality multimedia. What do we mean when we say multimedia? It doesn’t only mean videos. It can be images, video, music, graphs, and interactives like infographics.

Unfortunately, the Internet is full of mediocre multimedia that isn’t worth analyzing. To find quality multimedia, check out trusted institutions that are known for high-quality content, such as museums or PBS Kids. Or start with our list below!

Literature

  • iBooks: While the best content is paid, keep on eye on the free section. If you are interested in a paid book, try a sample before you buy to make sure it has multimedia.
  • Google Play/Google Books: As with iBooks, most of the best content is paid. But many public domain children’s books include the original illustrations and the content is available without an Apple device.
  • Met Museum: The illustrated story “Marduk, King of the Gods” is great for younger kids. It features audio, sound effects, and pictures.
  • Storyline Online: One of my favorites is this collection of videos of celebrities (Betty White, James Earl Jones, many more) reading famous picture books.
  • Reading Rainbow: This subscription-based app for iPad and Kindle Fire is an extension of the classic TV show. A classroom edition is coming for fall 2015.
  • Library of Congress: A great, free collection of classic public domain books presented in a nice viewer
  • Edsitement Websites: This list of recommended websites from the National Endowment for the Arts includes many great interactives. Filter by subject for best results.

Informational

  • National Archives: Part of the DocsTeach collection, this site is a great resource for videos, plus virtual Google Maps tours on HistoryPin.
  • PBS Learning Media: Great repository for videos (such as a science series with Curious George) and interactive stories (includes some fiction for younger kids too).
  • Met Museum: This interactive Vincent van Gogh bio with images, maps, and more is great for a cross-curricular study of art and history.
  • Smithsonian Air and Space Museum: A fun interactive website about aerodynamics
  • MinuteEarth: Looking for great science videos? Try these short and informational earth science videos
  • FiveThirtyEight: This site applies statistics to everything from politics to sports to movies. Use it for engaging graphs and analysis for older students.
  • Teaching History: Need a site for history or social students? Check out these oh-so-helpful reviews of history sites.
  • Google Cultural Institute: Just explore this one. You’ll love it.

What sites are we missing? Add them in the comments below!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAErin Dye is Manager of Consulting Services for Green Light Professional Development and a Google Certified Educator. She has extensive experience creating digital materials for interactive whiteboards and iPads. She writes about technology integration and GLPD’s work in local schools.